Response to those affected by the violence in Agok and Aneet – Situation Report No. 1 (as of 22 April 2022) – South Sudan

0

This report is produced by OCHA South Sudan on behalf of the Inter-Cluster Coordination Group (ICCG).

STRONG POINTS

  • An estimated 100,000 people have been affected, including 70,000 displaced, by fighting in the Abyei administrative area since intercommunal clashes erupted on February 10, 2022, with incidents escalating in March.

  • More than 40,000 people have been displaced to the states of Warrap in South Sudan and Bahr el Ghazal in the North. Most of the displaced are stranded in the open. Others are housed in host communities.

  • The fighting has led to the suspension of humanitarian operations in the affected areas and the relocation of aid workers.
    Activities have since resumed but are coordinated from central Abyei.

  • The humanitarian situation of the affected population is dire. People urgently need protection, food and nutrition, shelter, non-food items, health services, WASH and education.

  • The Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator has allocated $10 million to fill critical gaps.

OVERVIEW

Inter-communal tensions have increased in the Abyei Administrative Area (AAA) due to a long-running territorial dispute, disrupting the lives and livelihoods of more than 100,000 people, who are now in dire need of assistance humanitarian. Fighting began on February 10 but escalated in early March, leading to the suspension of humanitarian operations in affected areas and the transfer of aid workers to safety. Activities at AAA have since resumed but with limited capacity and are coordinated from central Abyei.

The violent clashes forced people to flee to various places in central and southern Abyei administrative area and to Twic county in South Sudan (34,000 people) and Aweil East and West counties (6 000 people). Although the exact number of displaced people remains to be confirmed, it is estimated that this number could be higher as some areas are not accessible due to insecurity. The affected population is in critical need of protection, food and nutrition, shelter, non-food items, health services, WASH and education. Several families who arrived in Twic County reported incidents of gender-based violence (GBV), while others reported that their children were missing. During the clashes, public and private infrastructure was destroyed and many settlements were looted.

Many displaced people who fled the violence took refuge in host communities, particularly in AAA. The majority of those who have fled to South Sudan are stuck under trees, or in huts made of sticks and plastic sheeting, or seek refuge in public schools and churches. Some initially displaced people returned to the town of Agok after the signing of the agreement “on the cessation of hostilities and to give the national government the opportunity to mediate and find a permanent solution to the conflict” between the two communities April 5. The return, however, is on a small scale.

Humanitarian partners operating in the area are mobilizing resources to help the most vulnerable people. However, the needs of displaced people have strained the resources and capacities of humanitarian organizations. With limited supplies and funding, the humanitarian situation is expected to deteriorate further as the rainy season approaches and most areas are prone to severe flooding. Authorities advised people to move to higher ground.

There are a limited number of partners operating in the targeted locations, and resources are being diverted from other emergencies in South Sudan to respond to the emergency in Twic, Aweil East and West counties. The Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator has allocated $10 million, through the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF), to fill critical gaps and support the most vulnerable.

Share.

Comments are closed.